Army Corps of Engineers Oyster Reef Restoration

Army Corps of Engineers Oyster Reef Restoration

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Norfolk District and its federal, state and local partners are working on an ambitious project that aims to increase the population of native oysters in the Lynnhaven River.

The Plan

As part of the district’s native oyster restoration efforts, the Corps has already built 58 acres of sanctuary oyster reefs in the Lynnhaven in 2007 and 2008. The reefs are constructed of fossilized oyster shell dredged from the James River and selected reefs were seeded with 2000 bushels of spat on shell oysters in the summer of 2008. The reefs were constructed in Broad Bay, Linkhorn Bay and the Eastern Branch of the Lynnhaven. Additional seeding of reefs was accomplished by Lynnhaven River Now during the summer of 2009. The project provides both ecological benefit and increased harvest on adjacent private leased grounds.

The Commonwealth of Virginia, as represented by the Virginia Marine Resources Commission, is the non-federal sponsor for the project. Other partners include the City of Virginia Beach, Lynnhaven River NOW, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Oyster Reef Keepers of Virginia, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Why the Lynnhaven?

The Lynnhaven River is considered a prime spot for oyster restoration because it is a trap estuary with high salinity; it had historically high populations of native oysters; and it has considerably higher oyster recruitment today than many other sites in the Chesapeake Bay. The project combines the latest techniques in restoration science with information gathered more than 100 years ago.  Corps scientists used such tools as hydrodynamic modeling and maps and historical records of productive oyster grounds to determine the best sites for reef construction.

The Corps mission is ecosystem restoration. A successful project will enhance commercial oyster production on areas, public or private, that could be fished. While Corps constructed reefs will become sanctuaries where no oyster harvesting will be permitted, other types of activities, such as crabbing and fishing, will be allowed on the reefs. Locations and heights of the constructed reefs are not expected to interfere with navigation in the Lynnhaven River.

Norfolk District has been engaged in restoring the native oyster species since 2001 and has completed three projects to date – the Rappahannock River, Tangier/Pocomoke Sound and the Great Wicomico River.

For more information on the Corps’ oyster restoration plans, click here .

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EVENTS CALENDAR

December 2018

Volunteer Appreciation Party

December 2, 2018
03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

Brock Environmental Center Oyster Room 3pm-5pm

Volunteer Training-Sustainable Yard Program

December 10, 2018
05:00 PM - 07:00 PM
Workshops

Help us as we begin our 2nd year of taking Pearl Homes to the next level! We are holding a training session for select volunteers to help implement our Pearl Homes Sustainable Yard Program, Monday, December 10th at the Brock Environmental Center. Training will run from 5-7pm, and include pizza and drinks.



Following trainingvolunteers who agree to participate in the program will commit to completing at least 5 on-site homeowner assessments in 2019. Each assessment should take no longer than 30 minutes, and will assess whether the residence is an appropriate site for either a rain barrel or soil test/Pearl Lawn Plan. In return volunteers will receive t-shirt, all necessary tools and information for site visit, and training. (If eligible,volunteers may also participate in the Sustainable Yard Program.)




 Email trista@lrnow.org to register. We hope to see you there!

http://www.lynnhavenrivernow.org/pearl-home-sustainable-yard-program/