Native Plant Guide

Native Plant Guide

2018 Native Plants of the Month

January:  Viola walteri ‘Silver gem’ Silver gem or Walter’s gem violet

March: Willow Oak – Quercus phellos 3 gallon – $38.00

April: Cinnamon Fern – Osmundastrum cinnamomeum 1 gallon – $14.00

**February, March and April native plants will be available for pickup the second week of April. Limited quantities available! Plants will go on sale March 1st and continue until they either sell out or until March 31st**

For more information on these plants click HERE 


May: Asclepias incarnata, Swamp Milkweed, 1gal

June: Polygonatum biflorum, Solomon’s Seal

July: Clematis virginiana, Virgin’s Bower


August:  Lobelia cardinalis, Cardinal Flower, 1gal

September:  Liatris pilosa, Grass-leaf Blazing Star, 1gal

October: Schizachyrium scoparium, Little Bluestem, 1 gal


 

November: Prunus serotina, Black Cherry, 1gal,3gal 2-3’, 4-6′

December: Aronia melanocarpa, Black Chokeberry (Red Chokeberry is pg.35), 1gal 2-3′,3gal


2017 “Native Plants of the Month”
Click HERE to view the native plants for each month!
February — Mertensia virginica, Virginia Bluebells
June — Asclepias tuberosa, Butterflyweed
August — Holenium autumnal, Sneezeweed
September — Euonymus americanus, Strawberry bush
October — Kosteletakya virginica, Salt Marsh Mallow
November — Craetegus viridis, Green Hawthorne
December — Aster caroliniaous, Climbing Carolina Aster

 

2016 “Native Plants of the Month”:

January- Ilex glabra, Inkberry
February – Redtwig Dogwood, Cornus sericea
March – Golden Wood Poppy, Stylophorum diphyllum
April – Mountain Laurel, Kalmia latifolia
May – Buttonbush, Cephalanthus occidentalis
June – Phlox, Phlox paniculata
July – NE Aster, Aster novae-angeliae
August- Witchhazel, Hamamelis virginiana
September – Pink Muhly Grass, Muhlenbergia capillaris
October – American Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis
November- Fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus
December- Partridgeberry, Mitchella repens

2015 (Archived)

January – Ilex verticillata Winterberry
February – LIndera benzoin Spicebush
March – Dicentra eximia Wild Bleeding Heart
April – Geranium maculatum Wild Geranium
May – Vaccinium ashei Bluberry
June – Passiflora coccinea Passionflower
July – Liatris spicata Coastal/Dense Blazingstar
August – Erogrostis spectablis Purple Love Grass/Sand Love Grass
September – Sambucus canadensis Elderberry
October – Chelone glabra Turtlehead
November – Hydrangea quercifolia Oakleaf Hydrangea
December – Dryopteris marginalis Marginal/Evergreen Wood Fern

2014 (Archived)

April – Cercis canadensis Eastern Redbud
May – Wisteria frutescens American Wisteria
June – Rudbeckia hirta Black-Eyed Susan
July –  Itea Virginica Virginia Sweetspire
August – Lonicera sempervirens Trumpet Honeysuckle
September – Asclepias syriaca Milkweed
October – Rhus glabra Sweet or Smooth Sumac
November – Callicarpa americana American Beautyberry
December – Ilex opaca American Holly

buffer2Planting natives at home is increasingly important as residential and commercial properties continue to encroach on our woodland and open space–at a rate of 6,000 acres/day in the US! Insects, bugs, birds and reptiles still need to live somewhere, and their options are becoming limited. Monarch butterflies are an alarming example of how quickly a species can suffer when key habitat plants, like milkweed, are lost. As insect and buy larvae are less available, this loss can quickly spread up the food chain to songbirds, raptors, reptiles, and amphibians. Many species, like monarchs, are specialists, and rely heavily or even completely on one sole source of food. When this food source disappears, so do they.

Native plants can be defined in many ways, but for our purposes, they are those that are naturally present (at least since written history), and that have adapted to life in our climate. This means that, in addition to providing habitat to the critters they have co-evolved with, they also tend to be relatively low-maintenance once established, requiring little to no fertilizer or irrigation, and helping to maintain our local water quality. This is in direct contrast to invasives, which are typically introduced (accidentally or intentionally) by humans, and have rapid growth, and spread. Invasives will often overtake native plants because there are no native predators or pests to control their growth and spread. Common invasive plants include: English Ivy, Common Orange Daylilly, Bradford Pear, Burning Bush, Japanese Barberry, Miscanthus, Tree of Heaven, Butterfly Bush, and Liriope.

We are working with several businesses and individuals to be able to provide resources for purchasing appropriate native plants. Please be careful when purchasing plants, as there are many cultivars (cultivated varieties bred to have different colors, foliage shapes, blooms, or size), which most often do not provide the same habitat value as the true native species. Wherever you shop, please help increase the availability of native plants by requesting them!

Some Sources of Native Plants:
Southern Branch Nursery (and landscape design)
Eric Gunderson, 757-373-7763
SBN@SouthernBranchNursery.com
www.SouthernBranchNursery.com

McDonald Garden Center
757-464-5564
1144 Independence Blvd, Virginia Beach, VA 23455
www.mcdonaldgardencenter.com

Wild Woods Farm Native Nursery
Vickie Shufer
Plants available at Virginia Garden Organic Grocery
wildfood@cox.net

http://www.ecoimages-us.com/nursery.aspx

For more information, email LRNow or call us at 757-962-5398.

EVENTS CALENDAR

February 2018

Stewardship & Access Committee MeetingEdit Event
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February 21, 2018
06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
Committees

http://www.lynnhavenrivernow.org/get-involved/

This committee meets at 6 pm on the third Wednesday of each month. Meetings are held at Hot Tuna  at 2817 Shore Dr., Virginia Beach, VA 23451. November and December meeting schedules may be adjusted to accommodate winter holidays. Check Facebook or website calendar for changes.

 

The Lynnhaven Trashion ShowEdit Event
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February 24, 2018
01:00 PM - 07:00 PM

The Lynnhaven Trashion Show


February 24th 2018

Trashion Show:
Location:
Lynnhaven Mall, Center Court

Times:
Middle School Show: 1-3 p.m.
High School Show: 5-7 p.m.

Trashion SHow save the date

 

5th Annual TRASHion Show Turns Garbage into Glamorous Fashion
Saturday, February 24, Lynnhaven Mall Show to Feature Middle & High School Students

(Virginia Beach) – On Saturday, February 24 middle and high school students will take the stage for the fifth year at Center Court in Lynnhaven Mall showing off their “Garbage Glam” in a runway fashion show presented by Lynnhaven River Now and Lynnhaven Mall.

The show was created as a way for local students to show off their fashion sense while demonstrating an understanding of the value and importance of reusing items whenever possible. Using only repurposed materials, student designers and models partner to present original creations in a runway fashion show competition.

“This is a friendly competition among students whose creations are made from what they can rescue from trash cans or recycling bins,” said Jody Ullman, Education Coordinator for Lynnhaven River Now. “It’s also a fun way to teach us all about rethinking trash”.

The program will include a high school show starting at 1 p.m., and a middle school program at 5 p.m. emceed by Kurt Williams (Anchor for WTKR). Judges will present awards for creativity and style, and the crowd will be invited to vote for a special People’s Choice Award. In addition, the high schools will again vie for the traveling “Principal’s Pride Award” for overall school efforts to promote sustainability both on and off the runway.

Cox, First Colonial, Landstown, Tallwood and Renaissance Academy high schools, and Brandon, Independence, Princess Anne, and Virginia Beach middle schools will all be rocking the runway this year.

There will be entertainment by local schools between the shows.

Lynnhaven River NOW, celebrating its 16th year, is comprised of more than 8,000 members committed to clean and healthy waterways throughout Virginia Beach. Through public awareness, educational programs and restoration initiatives, LRNow works to identify and reduce pollution, engage the community and restore lost habitats.

http://wtkr.com/2017/02/20/students-making-fashion-with-trash-on-coast-live/ -Video and information from the 2016 Trashion Show