Army Corps of Engineers Oyster Reef Restoration

Army Corps of Engineers Oyster Reef Restoration

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Norfolk District and its federal, state and local partners are working on an ambitious project that aims to increase the population of native oysters in the Lynnhaven River.

The Plan

As part of the district’s native oyster restoration efforts, the Corps has already built 58 acres of sanctuary oyster reefs in the Lynnhaven in 2007 and 2008. The reefs are constructed of fossilized oyster shell dredged from the James River and selected reefs were seeded with 2000 bushels of spat on shell oysters in the summer of 2008. The reefs were constructed in Broad Bay, Linkhorn Bay and the Eastern Branch of the Lynnhaven. Additional seeding of reefs was accomplished by Lynnhaven River Now during the summer of 2009. The project provides both ecological benefit and increased harvest on adjacent private leased grounds.

The Commonwealth of Virginia, as represented by the Virginia Marine Resources Commission, is the non-federal sponsor for the project. Other partners include the City of Virginia Beach, Lynnhaven River NOW, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Oyster Reef Keepers of Virginia, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Why the Lynnhaven?

The Lynnhaven River is considered a prime spot for oyster restoration because it is a trap estuary with high salinity; it had historically high populations of native oysters; and it has considerably higher oyster recruitment today than many other sites in the Chesapeake Bay. The project combines the latest techniques in restoration science with information gathered more than 100 years ago.  Corps scientists used such tools as hydrodynamic modeling and maps and historical records of productive oyster grounds to determine the best sites for reef construction.

The Corps mission is ecosystem restoration. A successful project will enhance commercial oyster production on areas, public or private, that could be fished. While Corps constructed reefs will become sanctuaries where no oyster harvesting will be permitted, other types of activities, such as crabbing and fishing, will be allowed on the reefs. Locations and heights of the constructed reefs are not expected to interfere with navigation in the Lynnhaven River.

Norfolk District has been engaged in restoring the native oyster species since 2001 and has completed three projects to date – the Rappahannock River, Tangier/Pocomoke Sound and the Great Wicomico River.

For more information on the Corps’ oyster restoration plans, click here .

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EVENTS CALENDAR

November 2018

Pearl Faith Workshop: Sacred Earth-Sacred Work

November 10, 2018
08:30 AM - 03:00 PM

sacred earth

Discover Virginia Beach: Nature Walk Stumpy Lake Natural Area

November 10, 2018
09:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Stumpy Lake Hike

Pearl Faith Community Workshop

November 10, 2018
09:00 AM - 03:00 PM

Waterway Cleanup

November 10, 2018
09:00 AM - 12:00 PM

November 10th, 9 am - noon - Potters Road - This cleanup is a land- and water-based cleanup. Water support will be launching from the Hutton Circle area, while land-based volunteers will meet at the Potters Road site. Participants wishing to work from the water should plan to bring their own kayak and paddling/cold weather gear. PFDs are required. Some kayaks may be available for use with advance registration. Advanced registration is recommended for final event details. Contact office@lrnow.org to register or for more information.

 
To register to participate in a waterway cleanup please email office@lrnow.org or call (757) 962-5398

Click on Waterway Cleanups for additional information

 

Partner’s Meeting

November 19, 2018
04:00 PM - 06:00 PM